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A Vegetable Garden for Two

Summer’s made it to our part of the country and with the hot weather, we had to hurry up and get our vegetable garden ready for planting! While we were building the raised garden beds a few weeks back, I was like “oh gosh, I hope I can fill them all…” (no seriously, I had a real moment of self doubt when I realized that we’re going to have a 200 sqft vegetable garden for two!) and guess what? It looks to be the perfect size after all!

New England Vegetable Garden by House of Menig

Back in winter I had started all of my seeds outside in milk containers and boy oh boy did those seeds grow since then! It’s fascinating to see that from a tiny little speck you can harvest beautiful vegetables all summer long. Amazing.

So, who wants to see what the vegetable garden looks like? Here we go!

RahelMenigPhotography_1991RahelMenigPhotography_1985New England Vegetable Garden by House of Menig

We’ve planted 57 heads of lettuce this year – with more coming to replace the first flush! You think that’s too much for a family of two? I thought so too, but nope! Since about a week we’ve been able to get a nice size salad each day, just by picking the outer leaves of the various lettuce heads. They taste so buttery and fresh and I’m craving them ALL.DAY.LONG

New England Vegetable Garden by House of MenigRahelMenigPhotography_1993

Just two days ago, I also set out my little tomato babies into their forever home. Yes, I raised them from seed, right outside the house! They had to survive almost freezing nights and now they’re strong and healthy and ready to grow big and tall! Plant count: 35 plants in 7 different varieties.

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Our biggest surprise came from our 6 vigorous zucchini plants! These babies hit the ground running!

New England Vegetable Garden by House of Menig

The herbs – the only plants I didn’t raise from seed – are all growing well too. I’ve mixed and matched the front beds with edibles, herbs and flowers. I hope to attract bees and other pollinators, as well as get a few cutting flowers throughout the summer. Here we have dahlias, bee balms, cosmos, pink California poppies, evening primrose, rhubarb, chives, parsley, green + purple basil, thyme and lots more!

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Another big experiment were the broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and brussels sprouts. I have no experience with them, but for now, the brussels sprouts have taken off and are growing like crazy. The broccoli, cabbage + cauliflower had a bit of a heat shock in our second real heatwave.. Not sure if they might be our first casualties…

New England Vegetable Garden by House of MenigNew England Vegetable Garden by House of Menig

This brings me to something I’ve wanted to share with any aspiring vegetable gardener. Here’s the deal, I have (almost) no clue what I’m doing. Sure, I’ve had a container veggie garden for the last three years, but mainly grew tomatoes and herbs and the occasional cucumber and zucchini.

The thing with a garden is, it’s all a big experiment! I’m treating my garden as that. One big (fun & exciting) experiment. Who cares if something dies? It’s not a big deal, and even more importantly, when you make mistakes you can learn from them. You eventually get better and the clueless guessing game becomes a more calculated endeavor. So go outside, get your fingers dirty and grow some veggies 😀

RahelMenigPhotography_1988

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